Tag Archive: DNS


Following on from: https://tickett.wordpress.com/2014/11/24/building-hosting-environment-part-1-hardware/

  • Configure IPMI (either use a static IP or setup a static DHCP lease)
  • Tweak the bios (ensure options are optimised for performance rather than to minimise noise etc)
  • Add DNS* entries for your IPMI and ESX Management Interfaces
  • Install ESXi (I did everything without the need to even plug a monitor/keyboard in, IPMI is a life saver)
  • Configure your management interfaces (use the IP addresses you previously configured in DNS, and the domain name you previously selected)

Now you can login with the vSphere client and configure a few more items;

  • NTP (on the Configuration tab under Software, Time Configuration)
  • Add your datastore (i’m using NFS, so I had to add a VMKernel interface first)

Until we have our vCenter server up and running we will stick to a single NIC.

*If you don’t yet have a device which provides DNS (router), you can add entries to your hosts file for now.

*Choosing a domain name; I’ve always gone with something.local or something.home in the past, but suffered as a result. I did a little research and found some articles suggesting best practice is to use a subdomain of an internet facing domain you own http://www.mdmarra.com/2012/11/why-you-shouldnt-use-local-in-your.html. So, say you own microsoft.com, your internal domain name may be ad.microsoft.com. You configure the NETBIOS name to be whatever you like, this will be used when you logon using NETBIOS\User rather than user@ad.microsoft.com.

Hopefully the shortest post yet :)

I was previously using GeoScaling (http://www.geoscaling.com/) to provide DNS for my domain names but they’ve had a few 24hr+ outages in the last year and this has caused havoc with (mainly with my e-mail as sending servers have been unable to resolve/deliver mail to my domain).

I anticipated it was time to cough up some cash for a professional, paid for service with guaranteed uptime, but stumbled across another free option- CloudFare (http://www.cloudflare.com). The switch was pretty seamless and (to the best of my knowledge) they’ve had no downtime since I migrated. They have a much larger infrastructure (presumably due to the paid for services they also offer) and even the free services supports a CDN style caching if you wish to save your webserver’s bandwidth.

I recently dropped my web hosting provider in favour of hosting my site at home (I already have the server infrastructure, and now I have a fairly reliable 80/20 internet service). However, I was not yet ready to host my own nameserver / DNS. So I went hunting for a free service. It took some time but eventually I found http://www.geoscaling.com

I got my A records, CNAME records and MX record configured with ease but couldn’t quite figure out the SRV records (I was trying to enter the port into the ttl/priority boxes, which looked ok in the records table but didn’t seem to function properly). I was able to check using NSLOOKUP.

Open a command prompt and type

nslookup
set type=all
_sip._tls.domain.tld

You should then see an answer as below:

If the SRV record isn’t configured correctly you will see a message: Non-existent domain as above.

Here is a screenshot of how you correctly enter the SRV record in the geoscaling web interface:

b797b185 c953 4bca a5aa 76b572ebbe17

fd7920c2 8599 4bf7 9d87 aa007925b548

872d86ce c5db 441d 9c22 e006e0ab498a

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